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new york. mr. schumer: well, passing this bill was really a very fine accomplishment, and of course we senators get up and stand up and are very proud of it, as we should be, but without our staffs, we couldn't get any of this done. so i would just like to take a few minutes to thank my staff, many of whom were personally impacted by superstorm sandy, who worked tirelessly to ensure that new york's needs were adequately addressed, as my state continues to react and recover to superstorm sandy and her aftermath. because of their hard work and tireless efforts, i know that new york's needs have been addressed in the sandy supplemental legislation that passed through the senate earlier this evening. my great l.d., heather mchugh, coordinated this effort, making sure every type of aid was considered and included in this package. she has great knowledge of both the senate and the house, and it was invaluable in getting this done. my deputy chief of staff, aaron sagervaun who is just so selfless and wonderful in making sure that every t is crossed and every i is dotted, i thank her as well.
from new york, mrs. maloney, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r. 6379. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized, and without objection. mr. farenthold: thank you very much, mr. speaker. h.r. 6379, introduced by the gentleman from south carolina, mr. clyburn, would designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 6239 savannah highway in ravenel, south carolina, as the representative curtis b. inabinett sr. post office. this bill was introduced on september 12. mr. speaker, mr. inabinett is a longstanding and faithful citizen of south carolina. he was born there in 1931 and attended grade school, college and graduate school in the state. later, he taught at baptist high school in charleston county and was appointed to the charleston county election commission. he became the medicare of ravenel, south carolina, and joined the s
new york times ." this is from the business section of "the new york times." there is this from the money section of "usa today." from "the wall street journal," and this headline from "the washington post." we have news from morning programs, where chuck schumer told nbc that he is in courage to mitch mcconnell his getting actively involved in talks. republican senator john stone noted the meeting among the president and congressional leaders is encouraging because people are talking. we want to check in. in the two hours since we last talked, any news you could clean? guest: no disrespect, but no. they are realistic these things often get resolve the blessed minute. it would not shock me if we are still talking like this 48 hours from now. the deadline it is 11:50 9:00 p.m. on the first. it looks bleak, but there are only five or six people that really know what is going on, and they are not talking to us. the effected they're talking to each other is encouraging. -- the fact that they are talking to each other is encouraging. host: let's walk through the scenarios. there is a
. let me offer you our best in this effort. mr. king has been the state director of the new york small business development center. he oversees 24 regional centers, 35 outbreaks centers. all of your experience must certainly be called bond at tested for the job that is ahead of you. the president and ceo of long island association, one of the most respected organizations in new york. he long island economy is made up of businesses, 90% employ 20 people or less. we are interested in what your businesses are saying, how we can be as helpful as possible. businesses,our hearts go out te that you have lost and the devastation. make sure that your buttons are pressed and you're speaking directly into the microphone. >> good morning, committee members. it is a privilege and honor to be here today. hoboken is located just across the river from new york city and is the home of frank sinatra. we have hundreds of businesses that call our square-mile city there,. we are one of the most densely populated cities in america, more than new york city. we rank no. 1 in per-capita use of public transport
. crowley speaks, obviously from new york. first of all, we need to pass the supplemental. the people of the northeast, luckily maryland was somewhat spared on this. but the people of new jersey, the people of new york, the people of connecticut in particular, others as well, have sustained a very, very damaging blow both corporately and individually. we need to act on that. historically supplementals are not paid for, are passed so that we can meet the immediate need. mr. crowley will speak to that. but let me say this. the answer to your question is it's part of the math. if we're going to put our country on a fiscally sustainable path, we're going to have to consider all the expenditures we made, whether we paid for them initially or not, we're going to have to put that into the math and it needs to be a part of the agreement. i've said this is a math problem. certainly the dollars we spend will have to be accounted for and will have to be paid for over a longer period of time. but we can amortize that immediate expense that we need to make on behalf of the severely adversely affec
need help. we desperately need help in the new york, new jersey area. last night two billion people around the world tuned into a benefit concert to help raise money for sand's reliefestings and now it is time for the government to step up to the place. congress has stepped up 39 times to help state and local governments to respond to disasters. there is a wisdom here that has been in the federal government for decades. that is, when god's hand strikes no localities can handle it on their own. we unite as a nation to help one another. following katrina the government passed aid following 10 days of after the storm. we passed nine fundamentals a total of $108 billion and frankly, the damage from sandy, the economic damage is worse. they lost about 270,000 homes and in new york we lost 305,000 homes. that is new york alone. they had about 20,000 small businesses, put out of business, gone. we have over 270,000. so the damage is enormous. and you know, we members of new york delegation have always been there when other parts of the nation were struck by distafters. new york tax dollars
. the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman from south carolina, the assistant democrat leader, mr. clyburn. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for three minutes. mr. clyburn: thank you, mr. speaker. i request permission to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. clyburn: i thank the gentlelady for yielding me this time. mr. speaker, when the so-called supercommittee failed last year to overcome the obstruction of the tea party republicans and their leader, grover norquist, to achieve a fair and balanced plan for deficit reduction, economic growth, and job creation it would take a decisive national election to settle the matter. i believe president obama's victory on november 6 was very decisive and pretty definitive. during the campaign president obama very clearly laid out his vision and the american people strongly affirmed his position. the president won all but one of the swing states. 62% of the electoral college, and carried the popular vote by more than 4.
to the rule, the gentlewoman from florida, ms. ros-lehtinen, and the gentleman from new york, mr. engel, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from florida. ms. ros-lehtinen: i thank the speaker, and i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and to insert extraneous materials into the record on this measure. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. ros-lehtinen: i thank the speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for as much time as she wishes to consume. ms. ros-lehtinen: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of house resolution 134, introduced by my good friend and colleague from illinois, mr. dold. house resolution 134 condemns the iranian regime's persecution of iran's baha'i minority. baha'i are the largest non-muslim population in iran, numbering over 300,000 members in iran alone. mr. speaker, this resolution marks the 12th congressional action urging the iranian regime to end its persecution of the baha
good friend from rochester new york, the distinguished ranking minority member of the committee on rules, ms. slaughter. pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. dreier: all time will be yielded for debate purposes only. i would like to ask, mr. speaker, unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks on this resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, i was just thinking about the fact that there are 26 letters in the alphabet, and we have had the first three letters used in discussion here on the house floor today. a, b, and my friend from worcester brought up the letter c in talking about this. we have what is so-called letter b. and i'm not doing a "sesame street" skit here. letter b is what we are talking about, plan b, and i think about plan a. plan a is what the majority in the house of representatives has been trying for the last two years to implement
don't realize, there are many more to be licensees that other people realize. in new york, where i am, the number is 28. there was a large allocation of these licenses before cable and satellite and what we're doing now, and this is the -- i think innovation of auctions, how can we use market mechanisms to reallocate some of that spectrum to mobile broadband in a win-win way? and that is what we're doing. that is why there will be brauferts who remain in new york and -- broadcasters who remain in new york and others. there is tremendous opportunity to free up spectrum to promote innovation. >> when we moved over the 200 megahertz in 2003, we had a two-star general who said it's absolutely technologically impossible to do. so again, do you have a process that's totally fair to the broadcasters and to the wireless industry that's in place? have you had them in your office simultaneously with their engineers to talk about the issues so that you can hear and your experts can hear the differences which they have? >> that's exactly what we're doing. through the notice and comment process, t
about it on the cover of the "new york times" today, a month ago is when she began talking about it. we have the publisher and author of a best seller called "secrets to winning a scholarship." next to him, an attorney with the national consumer law center and the author of several publications including "student loan lot," and "the guide to surviving student debt." next to her is the n.y.u. chief enrollment officer. he is in charge of the office of financial aid. so, to get into the solutions oriented discussion we're going to have today, the problem is something i think everybody is very familiar with, but i think of the saleogle's is an interesting harbinger. if you type in student loan, it will suggest student loan forgiveness. if you type in student debt, it will suggest student debt crisis. this is a problem many people worry about, whether it is at 3:00 a.m. when they cannot sleep or in the hospital staring at their new baby and wondering, how will i do this the way i want to, the way maybe my parents were able to manage in a previous generation. the average student graduates wit
of florida 1,300 days ago before his career at the denver broncos before his career in new york. so many things have happened since those 1,300 days in america. how could one important political party in this country not put forward a budget, a road map to where we want to go with our spending and to retire our debt? some things in our budget, the paul ryan/republican budget put forward is a pathway to eliminate our debt and our deficit without raising taxes and while preserving america's social safety net. and yet, the other side of the aisle put forth nothing in response. and the answer is because, i believe, they don't know where we're going. so any road will get them there. the president's budget was presented by timothy geithner to the house budget committee. we asked him, when does it balance? at what point out in the future does it eliminate our debt and deficit? and the answer was never. never. our country needs direction right now. and the people who are here tonight want to make sure that the people of america know where we're going. and yet, our president put forward a budget
. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentlelady from new york, ms. clarke, for five minutes. ms. clarke: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise to congratulate the outgoing chairman of the congressional black caucus, the remped and representative emanuel cleaver ii of missouri, who is my colleague and good friend. representative cleaver has graciously served with distinction in the house of representatives and the fifth congressional district of missouri for nearly eight years. he's been an outstanding chairman to the congressional black caucus, ushering the caucus to its 40th anniversary. he cares deep loar for all americans, children, seen -- deeply for all americans, children, seniors. who could forget his demonstrative leadership on the c.b.c. jobs tour where tens of thousands of americans lined up for an opportunity to present themselves to employers? from creating economic opportunity, supporting quality education to our children, for creating equal access to health care for all americans, chairman cleaver is truly -- has truly been the embodiment of the conscience of the congress
headquarters. i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york, and a woman thought this was really cute, and she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsey, and got a start on my political career making the case against the opponent as well. she gave me a white box with strings that looked to be pastries, and we opened it up, and there were all of these doughnuts in a wad of $10 bills. my first lesson in politics, the district leaders said you could keep the doughnuts. >> and david axelrod tonight, 8:0 p.m., -- 8:00 p.m. with -- on c-span. >> as president obama begins his second term in office, what is the most important issue he should consider? >> if you are in grades 6 through 12, made a short video. >> it is your chance to win a grand prize of $5,000. $50,000 in total prize is. for more information, go to student cam.corg -- .prg. first lady michelle obama and chefs how the demonstration at the white house dining room. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> are you excited? very nice
candidate for president. with that i yield to the distinguished lady from new york, a member of the appropriations committee, mrs. lowey, congratulate her on becoming the new ranking member. mrs. lowey: and i congratulate you on the wisdom that you share with us. mr. speaker, i rise in strong opposition to the bill. instead of putting forth a serious comprehensive and balanced deficit reduction plan, the republicans are taking a time-out so the house can embark on yet another effort to pass portions of the ryan budget. the same ryan budget that would end compare as we know it, walk away from the caps on discretionary spending agreed to in the budget control act and has no chance of being signed into law. our constituents want us to negotiate, agree to a solution to avoid economic catastrophe. i had concerns of some of the proposals that the president made in his negotiations with the speaker but at least the president was seeking a workable compromise. instead they walked away from the negotiating table, given everything our country has been through in the last two months fro
had the housing crisis. host: wanda in new york. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. we have a home in new york. i do not see prices rising in my area. we have a home in florida in a new development that we bought in 2006. our interest rate is 6.5%. we are unable to refinance and severely under water. maybe half of the homes are sold. the rest are for clothes. -- are foreclosed upon. we do not have a fannie or freddie mortgage. what is there for us? it just seems clear on this treadmill and we cannot seem to get ahead. do you see there is a potential for us going forward in helping people with that second home that is severely underwater with a 6.5% interest rate? guest: the mortgage availability for second homes. not be part of dodd-frank was limiting mortgage availability for second homes. the difficulty of getting the mortgages for second homes and the over stringent in getting a mortgage. during the downturn, second home mortgages are a great -- they are a great help in the overall recovery. they are not participating other than all cash buyers. the all cash buye
on a regular basis with your parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. rauf would read -- mrs. roth would read the newspaper and the about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running f mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york'. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got i early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and the were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you c
president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> former "new york times"" photo critic vicki goldberg has gathered a few of her favorite white house photos in "the white house, the president's home in photographs in history." watch sunday evening at 7:30 eastern and pacific on c- span3's "american history tv." >> "washington journal" continues. we're glad to have back william frey from the brookings institution. and do jennifer ortman. population will be in excess of 400 million people in the u.s. what is going to change? guest: the nation is projected to grow at a slower pace over the next 38 years. the population will continue to age. that the nation is projected to become more diverse in growth, minority population, and decrease in population. host: look at these numbers. 420 million -- how do face the demand of that growing population? education, health care? guest: that is a perfect question for bill. guest: it really is a slower growth than we have been used to for a long time. about a 34% growth rate over those 48 years. we have been going on about 10% a decade. we'll
. southern england was in debt. now it is the opposite. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks do
and gas production everywhere, in alaska, offshore, it is coast, west coast, gulf coast, in new york, pennsylvania, in the eagle ford areas. that has enormous implications in terms of gdp growth. because of the enormity of the issue, you have to continue to reduce demand. >> what role should the government play in the future -- your business is in transportation, too -- we are mired in conversations about the government play in the future f. we are talking about long-term infrastructure, a long term energy plan. >> this is the perfect opportunity for the government to work together to achieve a common goal. there is plenty of times when our interest might not call last with the interest of either of -- might not coalesce with the interest of either of the parties. this is the opportunity we have never had before. you could have consumer, business, and the government's all working together to take advantage of this huge resource. for us, it makes so much sense because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 a quilt when -- the equivalent with natural gas. from the government point
new york times took ." president obama plans to ask congress for about $50 billion for emergency funds to help rebuild the state's the were ravaged by hurricane sandy. regional leaders complained wednesday it was not enough. the white house will send the proposal to capitol hill this week. it should be between $45,000,000,000.50 $5 billion, according to officials -- $45 billion and $55 billion, according to officials. both democratic and republican lawmakers from the region quickly expressed disappointment in the pending request and lobby the administration to increase it before sending it to congress. sue in oklahoma on our line for independents. i think we have time for your point. caller: in a column today it said that clinton's 2001 balance the budget spent $1.94 trillion. today the revenue is $2.67 trillion. spending is $3.76 trillion. we are spending $987 billion more than if we had just increased the 2001 budget for inflation and population growth. i understand about the mores. i am incensed, as i think most voters are -- wars. i am incensed, as i think most voters are. host: th
. nothing to stop the epidemic of senseless gun violence that plague not only our major cities like new york and chicago, but countless small towns throughout our nation, towns with names like newtown, aurora, tucson, dekalb, blacksburg and littleton. in the years i have been a member of this body, this house has not held a single hearing, not one to address gun violence. while over 30,000 americans die each year from gun violence, over 400 lives have been lost by gun violence in my hometown of chicago, people are dying every day. . we in this body are afraid to talk about it. the time has come for us to stop listening to the gun lobby and start listening to the american people. the fact is the majority of americans gun owning and not, desire commonsense, reasonable gun regulation. congress must no longer stand in the way of reasonable legislation, instead we must champion it. the american people want to see background checks required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform b
and went on to study elsewhere. she debuted at the metropolitan opera house in new york in 1995. she has performed on four continents and song with all the greats in the industry. "the new york times" said this. "she has a classic voice with a wide range. from her low voice to her top notes, she is a compelling stage actress. if anything, she underestimates her charisma." the critic noted that his favorite moment was after her arrest, sitting on a table with her hands tied behind her back, she slowly lifted her skirt above her knees with her teeth. he wrote that from that moment, she had the audience enthralled. thank you both for being here. >> i have just had knee surgery. we were at the kennedy center honors. my husband said it will be difficult to lift your skirt with your teeth. >> i want to start with a question for both of you. was there one person who was your mentor role model and inspired you to be where you are now? >> i started off in the magazine industry. i cannot say i had a mentor early on. the person who inspired me most is probably clay falker. he started "new york" mag
new york, the bipartisan safer act, companion bill with the bipartisan bill in the senate by senator cornyn and senator bennett. the safer act does a lot of good things but basically it allows funding to go and -- so that we make sure we test these cases. it audits these backlogs so we know where these cases are that are sitting on the shelves. it does the audit. it brings funding and brings these cases to justice so that we can make sure that these victims of crime have their day in court as well. d.n.a. is a wonderful thing, and it's important that we make sure that evidence is available for law enforcement, for prosecutors and judges in the courtroom. she was a child, lavenia was a child when she was sexually assaulted. that was a long time ago, but there are 400,000 cases waiting to be tested. this is something we can do in a bipartisan way today to test those cases, to bring justice to the victims of crime and make sure those outlaws get their day in court as well and be held accountable for the rape of children in our country. and that's just the way it is. i yield back. the sp
columnist. he is with us from new york. yesterday, we spoke about the normalcy of the stock market but today reaction to what happened in washington with stocks tumbling, down more than 120 points. michael, thank you for being with us yet again. what are you looking at, here in washington, what our financial experts telling you? guest: the maneuvers yesterday, the failure to bring the boat disturbed a little bit of an overly comfortable consensus here in washington that a deal was pretty much in the bag. i think we are now having to yesterday, the failure toreconcile the newh is nothing likely to happen today. obviously, you want to hear what the speaker has to say. but right now, the market is hopeful that it gets at least what i would call a small bargain. i think that would be enough to satisfy financial types. let alone a very big picture budget questions that seemingly have been on and off the table variously for the past few weeks. host: "the wall street journal" in an editorial suggesting extending reality, which all tax cuts for the six months to give congress time to work out an agr
unemployment extended benefits, versus new york, which has the highest level of weeks allowed right now because of their differing unemployment rates. guest: it is administered by states. i think a lot of the state programs are too restrictive in their eligibility and have to look capps. there are some important steps forward in the american recovery act -- too low caps. there are some important steps forward and the american recovery act. i do not see a lot of prospects for much greater federal involvement any time soon. host: mableton, illinois on the line for independents. caller: i want to direct this to mr. tanner. i have never been in debt. i have a retirement, have a very nice pension from the state of california bar when i was a state police officer. -- for when i was a state police officer. we're not putting enough emphasis on what has happened in the last 10 years, seven trillion dollars t 6o de dollars trillion and we lost in pensions. --7 dollars trillion to $60 trillion that we lost in pensions. what would you do? how long do you think it should take to get out of this mess that th
and the big states, new york, california, and illinois, would have to much influence of a think there is a balance. others think that sent the candidates primarily go to these battleground states where it is too close to call to make up the 270 electoral college votes, that the other states get ignored and it suppresses turnout of therefore it is not good for democracy. so, there have been many amendments over the years. not many recently. they stopped in 1979. there was only one attempted to build this last session, 113th congress, did not go anywhere. many amendments attempted -- many states have innovations which we can talk about later if you like. to change the way they count the votes. host: let's go to the phones and go to casey from atlanta, georgia. caller: good morning. and good morning to your guest. guest: good morning. caller: i believe that this conversation is so enlightening and informative. professor thurber can certainly -- i believe 1988, in the state of west virginia, there was a democratic elector that was pledged for the democratic nominee, governor dukakis
of new york's capital city, albany. saturday at noon eastern on booktv own c-span2, and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> now, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined bay former obama administration at visor on iran who discusses iran's program. the foundation for the defense of democracies held this event. >> good morning. it's a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. very quickly set the stage. i don't need to tell anyone who is in this room about the depth of the problem of human rights abuses in iran. i would just read very briefly from the report that the u.p. report filed for the u.n.gen assembly when it was highlight, quote, pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations for several years, and the ug general assembly submitted a report in which he said he was, quote, deeply troubled by increased numbers of executions. a pew addition, arbitrary arrests and detention, unfair trials, torture, and ill treatment, and crackdown on human rights act
little kids. >> that's it, no more, come back to us on the debt ceiling. "new york times" said that is a fullback position. >> i don't want to fill into all of that because i'm obviously confident that there are enough people, majority of people in this town understand what we are playing with, playing chicken with is the most important country in the world and we are on the verge of doing perhaps lasting damage to this extraordinary country that we inherited. that being said, before we talk about fiscal cliff, we are here because of the last fiscal cliff. since we had another fiscal cliff-type scenario that created the scenario and ridiculous idea that i voted against, put a bunch of things bad to happen at one time. surprise, it didn't work and we are facing this. there are two issues number one, avoid doing damage and avoid doing harm. and we need to look for a way to accomplish that in the short-term. and we have to, we have to have a conversation about getting the fiscal house in order. i heard bob talking about that. it is true. we spend $1 trillion more than we take in.
metropolitan of boston, new york, l.a., and as a consequence of that, it can win elections but it always has difficulty enforcing the elections. it is somewhat ironic that party fell apart because of the slavery crisis. it was responsible for the whole idea of expansion westward and it was the issue of slavery in that territories -- what will the state is in the territories be? it fell apart as a consequence of its fundamental basis of american expansion westward. the whigs and the republicans were more or less opposed to expansion because they saw the expansion of slavery. in 1930 and 1931, republicans in the midst of the depression may have made the economic slump worse by doubling down on the terrace and the gold standard -- to colors of their post civil war policy that proved successful in the past but that were of doubtful at the sea in the new circumstances prevailing after the great war. what do i mean by that? the gold standard and the tariff worked as long as america is an out liar in a european dominated system. this is true all the way up to world war one so that the european powe
new york times," but it's everywhere -- host: representative huelskamp, for close watchers of congress, they understand that you've had a little bit of a kurfuffle with speaker boehner. what is your current relationship with speaker boehner? guest: for folks that are unaware, i was removed from two committees and three of my colleagues were stripped of their preferred committees as well. i don't believe any of us received any advanced notice. it's big boy politics up here. but recognize i think for most americans it looks petty, it looks vindictive because it was based on the way we voted. there was a secret scorecard, peter, that was involved. the steering committee of about 30 republicans went into a closed door meeting, gave no notice to me. they didn't tell me what committees i'm going to be on neck year. for a few weeks, committeeless is not necessarily a bad thing, peter. i -- in this case i'm a fifth generation farmer. someone has been on the ag committee for 101 years from kansas and have the speaker and other g.o.p. leaders punish me for my conservative votes and punish my con
to the president $800 billion in revenue, all through closing loopholes dealing with deductions new york increase in rates. first of all, on the base exmath, can you get to $800 billion over 10 years that way? how would you do it not knowing exactly all the specific he is offered up? an more importantly as i work my sources on capitol hill and look at what the president has offered $1.6 trillion, others said $1.2 trillion, could you get to $1.2 trillion simply by eliminating deductions and installing caps there without raising rates? >> i'm going to play the think tanker inside washington card and go back to what's not achieveable and then come back to that. if you think about it from the economic perspective, a hierarchy of the best ways to raise more revenue. the first, the senator mentioned, and a group of people earlier today mentioned, growth is undoubtedly the best way to raise additional revenue. you can find a way to do that. we talk about growth inside the fiscal discussion and that's important but there are other things we can do as a nation toen courage growth, an obvious one is intell
/4 of a century ago. i was a reporter for the new york times back then, and i had the great privilege of covering senator lieberman, senator daniel patrick moynihan, and senator bill bradley. and i have to tell you, i have a lot of fun. that was a great job to have. over the years you have worked consistently to expand the reach of freedom at home and abroad. you became a distinguished adviser to this organization. a great credit to you also is a talented and dedicated staff you have assembled. it is a treat and privilege that we get to work with them. senator kyl, working with you and your staff, also immensely talented people, smart, dedicated, has been an honor but also an education. i have learned so much about missile defense. you have been singularly committed to policies that promote peace through strength. you have steadfastly opposed any effort is to compromise the united states national defence. it expertise on a range of issues is unmatched in the u.s. senate and will be greatly missed. you have earned a reputation for strategic thinking on matters of great complexity. in light of your
on and look atta just that building. that one building on park avenue in new york, the average income for the residents was $1167,000 a year. the average income. the average tax rate was 14.7%. and ovebling that is because of the difference between unearned income, capital gains and dividends and earned income. now at the same time he looked at a new york city janitor who might be working in that building. their average income $33,000 for the same year but with a tax rate of 24.9%. so the janitor who might work in that building is paying a tax rate ten points higher than the people who live in the building who have an average income of over $1.1 million. anybodyknow how justifies that as a fair sharing of the burden in this country. and warren buffet has been very clear as one of the wealthiest people in the world, certainly one of the wealthiest people in this country that he find it's prosperous that he pace a tax rate a 23r5x of the tax rate -- that he pays a tax rate that is a fraction of the tax rate paid by his executive assistant. so i would hope that in any final agreement tha
building on park avenue in new york and he was able to do it because they happened to have the statistics that isolate that one building. do you know what he found? that the average income in that building was $1,167,000 for the year. $1,167,000. the average tax rate of the people in that building was 14.7%. the janitor in that building had an income of $33,000 and he paid a tax rate of 24.9%. is this fair? is it fair that people making $1.1 million paid a tax rate of 14.7% and the janitor who served them, earning $33,000 a year, paid a tax rate of 24.9%? well, i personally don't think so. and i know all the arguments. i've served on the finance committee. i've heard it all. the biggest reason for this differential, by the way, is not the earned income tax rate, which has had almost all of the attention in this national discussion. almost all of the attention has been on the earned income tax rate and raising it from 35% to 39.6%. almost no attention has been paid to the unearned income tax rate on capital gains and dividends. the unearned rate is currently 15%. that's what allows very we
're quite to head to springfield gardens new york. caller: good night to everyone into the whole world, especially the united states. i want to wish everyone a prosperous happy new year. i am really disappointed in the fact that i see big grown women and men in the senate cannot come together to prevent this fiscal call. i am a husband. i bring most of the money into the home. the way i look at it is that if there is a crisis going on in my family i am more than likely to step up to the plate and do what is up for necessary to make ends meet. that is a principle i have been living with all my life. to see that the republicans are sitting near in not trying to do the right thing is here. that is all i have to say. host: jeremiah from maryland. i think the vice president should not be the one in negotiating with mitch mcconnell. the person who should be negotiating with mitch mcconnell is the president of the united states of america. as america i am not happy with the way he is representing me or my country. he should not have his vice- president of their debating. that is all i have to
think i'm going to new york -- i'm going to new york tomorrow to spend time with some of our members there and seeing the devastation that's occurred. the gentleman and i know is very aware of that. we need a supplemental so we need time to do that. and it's not a very sexy issue but postal reform is again another issue we're talking about balancing. the postal department has not been able to balance its budget, as we know. part of it is dealing with the retirement programs that they're funding. but i'm wondering if the gentleman has any thoughts on any one of those four bills. i'll yield to my friend. mr. cantor: i'll try to be brief. on the farm bill, the gentleman is correct. we will face some very dire consequences if we don't act on the very issue prior to leaving here. part of what i indicated last week is that is something we are focused on and know we have to deal with the issue prior to the end of the year. on the issue of vawa, as the gentleman and i knows, we can't go to the conference with a senate bill. the sflat has a blue slip problem. i am speaking with the president
introduce adam, supreme court correspondent for "the new york times." >> as david said, you guys are in for a treat. you really couldn't ask for a better panel to think through these issues how to balance integrity and access. i'm going to say a word about each of the panelists, their biographical material is available to you. then we'll hear brief presentations from each of them and a more general conversation and save time for your questions at the end. natalie tennant is the secretary of state in west virginia. she's the state's most transparent office holder. i'm literal minded so i half expected a ghost. more seriously she's also had more investigations and convictions for election violations than any other secretary in west virginia's history. maybe later on we can talk about what the data is and what kinds of problems election administrators face. and then hear from ground zero of the 2012 elections is secretary of state of ohio, jon husted, who has had a distinguished career before his current job in the ohio legislature as having served as speaker of the ohio house and a
and nothing else. >> the republican leader said on the floor today that 10 years ago new york 2001, the federal government spent $1.6 trillion. 10 years later, we've managed to double that to $3.8 trillion. this is clearly a spending problem. the president over and over again said over the course of the campaign we needed a balanced approach but we very specific on raising taxes, no specifics on cutting spending. no specifics on the sequestration. when was the last time we heard the president talk about whr you going to do about the sequestration? i heard some discussion, if the taxes come in, we don't have to make the cuts that doesn't sound like a balanced approach. you need to have spending cuts and that's going to be part of the discussion -- that has to be part of the discussion about revenue or this is a discussion that doesn't solve the problem. heard here twice, this basically when the president gets the tax increase, and by the way, suddenly, almost all of the bush tax policies appear to be the best ol policys in the world, the 10% bracket, the marriage penalty, the child
as much money. david brooks i'm sure you're aware of david brooks' column in the "new york times," not a liberal democrat, not a democrat, i don't think he's a democrat or a republican, but more conservative columnist, says this and i quote from "the new york times" just a few days ago, sometimes you have to walk through the desert to get to the promised land. this is a quote. a budget stalemate will confirm every bad republican stereotype. republicans will be raising middle class taxes in order to serve the rich. hurting sam's club to benefit the country club. if they do this, they might as well get mitt romney's 47% comment printed on t-shirts and wear them the rest of their life. i say this not to criticize but to say that ther is peppings is if we do not act on something on which we agree, we are not doing so because we wancht to make sure that the best off -- we want to make sure that the best off if they're not helped, nobody will be helped. i think that's not good for the country. i think frankly it's not good for the congress. not necessarily republicans or democrats. i t
on september 8, 2001 new york sacramento, california. -- in sacramento, california. >> my name is paul mauser, i'm the father of paul maus -- of daniel mauser who was killed in the massacre at columbine high school. >> my name is paul wilson. my beautiful wife christy lyn wilson, 26 years, was cowardly shot and killed in california, onth 12, 2011. -- october 12, 2011. >> i'm andre, i am father of bear. my son miraculously survived the shooting, he was in the line of fire. i am here not to represent the entire town, i am here just on my own accord. >> obviously the town that andre is talking about is newtown, connecticut. before we begin, is there anybody else here who has a story they want to share? i also come to this issue through personal experience. my younger brother was shot in a shooting that happened on the observation deck of the empire state building and i have some prepared remarks here but before i begin them, i just want to point out today there will be 32 more families that know the pain and horror that you just heard here today. we pay a lot of attention, and appropriately so,
, representative of the seventh district of new york. >> thank you speaker and reverend conroy. thank you to all of my colleagues here today as well as the distinguished senators here with us. mrs. bush and madam secretary, our thanks and appreciation to both of you for not only taking the time to be here today, but for your many contributions to this effort and for your commitment to advancing the cause of freedom and democracy in burma. i would be remiss if i did not also mentioned someone who is not with us here today and that is congressman tom lantos. he and his staff worked so hard on burma for so many years. i wish you were here today to share this moment in history with us. today is an amazing day. today is an incredible day. who would have thought that when this bill was introduced in the house in 2008, when aung san suu kyi was still under house arrest, that in a few short years she would be standing or sitting here with us on u.s. soil receiving this honor, and as a member of the burmese parliament? back then we thought about granting the medal in absentia, which may have been the fir
groups. >> an article in the "new york times" referenced the rape capital of the world comment, and he asked the question, what strategic purpose is there of putting an ak-47 assault rifle inside a woman and pulling the trigger or cutting out a woman's fetus and making her friends eat it? the government's response has been a shrug. that is diabolical. and yet, we are funding on a yearly basis $480 million into this country that allows this horrendous abuse to go on. it appears we do it with full knowledge of the extent of these rapes, and we're not holding them accountable. it is like giving an addict more dope. how do we justify it? >> the funding the defense department is providing is for the training and education that would instill discipline to prevent this very kind of horrific behavior. it is absolutely unacceptable. the funding but supported for specific programming to prevent this from happening from the congolese military. the rebel groups, that is another problem. there is outrageous and unacceptable things happening. our programs are aimed to ensure that does not happen. >
the things the we do here, unemployment, energy problems -- when i get up in the morning, i get "the new york times," and the first place i go is the sports page. for a few minutes every morning, i dream of the athlete that i wanted to be. [laughter] and as i have dreamed over the decades, i thought, wouldn't it be great to be able to meet a babe ruth or lou gehrig? or maybe a rocky marciano? joe frazier? but today, i have been able to meet two of the people i have dreamed about going down to that 18th hole. with a good put, i can win this thing. this is a personal privilege for me to be able to meet the great jack nicklaus and to be here to help honor the great arnold palmer. we know that arnold palmer has played on the finest courses that the world has. he has designed 300 golf courses. seven of them are in nevada, operating now. he has won trophy after trophy after trophy. he has been swinging golf clubs since a little boy of four years old. he was always such a big star. i hope, arnold, you'll remember. you and winnie were traveling across the country. they stopped a long way from las veg
words followed by deeds. with that let me yield to the vice chair-elect, the gentleman from new york, mr. crowley. >> thank you, xavier. many of my colleagues have come to know my family in a personal way. all three of my children were born while i've been a member of congress. i have a little guy by the name of liam. he's 7 years old. and yesterday i learned of a little boy named ben wheeler who loved to ride the seven line, the seven train that goes from times square all the way out to what was once shea stadium, now citifield. i love the seven as well. so do my children. i saw on my face my own little boy and i think that for many of us, whether it be democrat or republican, that has to strike home. it certainly did for me and my family. i think that's what made this particular event, if you can say it's unique, it's unique in that the innocence that was lost on friday was like no other. not to even compare innocence of what happened in aurora to connecticut, but when little children are just taken in that way i think it brings all of us to this table. as john larson has said, inactio
and she from new york served from 1996-1998 and from 2005 until the present. they will lobby retiring from congress at the end of the year. i would -- they will all be retiring from congress at the end of the year. the record for -- will remain open for five business days for any member of the committee who wishes to submit a statement or additional questions. if there is nothing further, we are adjourned. thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the joint economic committee held its hearings on the fiscal cliff, house minority leader nancy pelosi spoke to reporters about the issue. she called the republican proposal "an assault on middle- class and seniors." >> good morning. here we are. thursday in december, the talk around here is what is going not at the negotiating table. is anything going on at the negotiating table? what is important, i think, is what is happening at kitchen tables across america. the relationship to decisions that are made here to what those discussions are. i think it is importan
't have virginia or new york, it wouldn't work. so it came about one of the great informal agreements in american legal history, there was an agreement, an informal agreement, that if the constitution were ratified as written bit 1787 convention, that there would be a bill of rights. and the statesmen, and there were statesmen in those days, kept their word so we had a bill of rights in 1791. and the result is we have a hamiltonian structure and jeffersonian bill of rights. and let me mention a few things about each of those. insofar as structure, they are different structures but one of the principal ones is separation of powers and checks and balances. we use those terms often interchangeably, separation of powers and checks and balances but they actually have a different thrust. separation of powers. teaches each brafrpbl of the government has a certain autonomy to act on its own. checks and balances works the other way around. checks and balances indicates the government cannot of course operate unless the branches interact with each other. there's a certain newtonian metaphor to
vice chairman of the democratic caucus, mr. crowley from new york. >> first -- thank you. i appreciate that round of applause. let me thank both john and javier for including me in this press conference and for welcoming me to the leadership of the house of the democratic caucus. i'm very pleased to be here at this very important moment in time in our nation's history as well. i agree with both john, javier, and i should say as well with tim walz and i won't steal your thunder, tim, what you do today is important not only i think for we as a caucus in terms of setting where we are at but i think also a strong message that the american people sent almost a month ago had a they want to see this congress working to get things done. they re-elected the president. the president ran on an agenda of giving a tax break to 98% of the american people, and that opportunity is before us. the senate has worked their will. it's now our opportunity to do that before the holiday season is over. the expression time is fleeting has never been more apropos than it is today. we have very few working days
new york served from 1996-1998 and from 2005 until the present. they will all be retiring from congress at the end of the year. the record will remain open for five business days for any member of the committee who wishes to submit a statement or additional questions. if there is nothing further, we are adjourned. thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> this afternoon at 5:30, we will have a discussion about cycles of political change in the u.s. we will hear from the manhattan institute about how u.s. debt, economic growth, and the retirement of baby boomers could lead to political and economic change. and look at our prime time schedule on the c-span network starting at 8:00 eastern. president obama visiting an auto plant and he will talk about the fiscal cliff and the needs of middle class family. on c-span2, michael powell on the future of television. then a discussion of the iran nuclear program. that is across the sea span networks. on capitol hill, the house returns tomorrow. members w
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